Keto diet

Image Credit: TimesNowNews

A recent study suggests that the ketogenic diet, known for its weight loss benefits, may also have potential in fighting cancer. The diet, which involves consuming high-fat and low-carb foods, can trick the body into burning its own fat for energy, aiding in weight loss. Researchers discovered that the ketogenic diet could starve tumors of the glucose they require to grow, potentially combating various types of cancer.

In a study conducted on mice with pancreatic and colorectal cancer, the Keto diet led to the accumulation of toxic lipid byproducts that killed cancer cells through a process called ferroptosis. However, the study also found that the diet caused cachexia, a wasting disease, which poses a challenge.

To address this issue, the researchers paired the keto diet with corticosteroids, effectively preventing cachexia in mice with cancer. These mice experienced tumor shrinkage and lived longer.

The team aims to further refine the timing and dosage of corticosteroids to enhance the effectiveness of cancer therapies in combination with the ketogenic diet. By expanding these effects, they hope to slow cancer growth and ultimately improve treatment outcomes for patients.

Re-reported from the story originally published in TimesNowNews

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Keto Diet’s Potential Cancer Protection

Keto diet

Image Credit: TimesNowNews

A recent study suggests that the ketogenic diet, known for its weight loss benefits, may also have potential in fighting cancer. The diet, which involves consuming high-fat and low-carb foods, can trick the body into burning its own fat for energy, aiding in weight loss. Researchers discovered that the ketogenic diet could starve tumors of the glucose they require to grow, potentially combating various types of cancer.

In a study conducted on mice with pancreatic and colorectal cancer, the Keto diet led to the accumulation of toxic lipid byproducts that killed cancer cells through a process called ferroptosis. However, the study also found that the diet caused cachexia, a wasting disease, which poses a challenge.

To address this issue, the researchers paired the keto diet with corticosteroids, effectively preventing cachexia in mice with cancer. These mice experienced tumor shrinkage and lived longer.

The team aims to further refine the timing and dosage of corticosteroids to enhance the effectiveness of cancer therapies in combination with the ketogenic diet. By expanding these effects, they hope to slow cancer growth and ultimately improve treatment outcomes for patients.

Re-reported from the story originally published in TimesNowNews