Plant experts suggest moving houseplants outside for summer benefits

As the weather warms up, your houseplants are likely to thrive and grow after enduring the dark, cold months. This active growth phase is an excellent time to give your indoor plants some extra care. One beneficial step is to move houseplants outdoors, allowing them to soak up the sun and enjoy better air circulation.

Image credit: nomadnes via Getty Images

Experts recommend this move for several reasons. “Your plants will photosynthesize more and grow faster in increased sunlight outdoors,” says Vladan Nikolic from Mr. Houseplant. “They will also benefit from fresh air, increased airflow, and humidity.” Many common indoor plant problems, such as drooping and discoloration, result from insufficient light. Moving your plants outside can address this issue by boosting their exposure to natural sunlight.

Moreover, outdoor air circulation helps prevent plants from staying damp, which can lead to pests, diseases, and root rot. Rainwater, which contains beneficial nitrogen, can also reduce the need for frequent watering and keep foliage clean and dust-free. Raffaele Di Lallo from Ohio Tropics notes, “Rainwater is wonderful for plants and helps them green up after a good rain.”

However, timing is crucial. Sally Allsop, founder of All That Grows, advises, “The best time to move your houseplants outdoors is between late spring and early summer.” By May or June, the risk of frost has usually passed, allowing you to gradually introduce your plants to warmer outdoor conditions. It’s essential to avoid late frosts, which can harm even cold-tolerant plants.

Gradual acclimation is key to preventing stress reactions like wilting and discoloration. Start by placing your houseplants outside for just a few hours a day in shaded spots. The specific timing depends on the plant species and their hardiness. For example, tropical plants like alocasia should be moved outside when night temperatures are consistently above 50-54°F. Plants like philodendron and peace lily can go outside when temperatures are above 55°F, while prayer plants and calathea need temperatures above 59°F.

Research your plant’s needs and monitor outdoor temperatures to ensure a smooth transition. Following these tips will help your houseplants enjoy the benefits of outdoor living during the warmer months.

Re-reported from the article originally published in Homes & gardens.

Plant experts suggest moving houseplants outside for summer benefits

As the weather warms up, your houseplants are likely to thrive and grow after enduring the dark, cold months. This active growth phase is an excellent time to give your indoor plants some extra care. One beneficial step is to move houseplants outdoors, allowing them to soak up the sun and enjoy better air circulation.

Image credit: nomadnes via Getty Images

Experts recommend this move for several reasons. “Your plants will photosynthesize more and grow faster in increased sunlight outdoors,” says Vladan Nikolic from Mr. Houseplant. “They will also benefit from fresh air, increased airflow, and humidity.” Many common indoor plant problems, such as drooping and discoloration, result from insufficient light. Moving your plants outside can address this issue by boosting their exposure to natural sunlight.

Moreover, outdoor air circulation helps prevent plants from staying damp, which can lead to pests, diseases, and root rot. Rainwater, which contains beneficial nitrogen, can also reduce the need for frequent watering and keep foliage clean and dust-free. Raffaele Di Lallo from Ohio Tropics notes, “Rainwater is wonderful for plants and helps them green up after a good rain.”

However, timing is crucial. Sally Allsop, founder of All That Grows, advises, “The best time to move your houseplants outdoors is between late spring and early summer.” By May or June, the risk of frost has usually passed, allowing you to gradually introduce your plants to warmer outdoor conditions. It’s essential to avoid late frosts, which can harm even cold-tolerant plants.

Gradual acclimation is key to preventing stress reactions like wilting and discoloration. Start by placing your houseplants outside for just a few hours a day in shaded spots. The specific timing depends on the plant species and their hardiness. For example, tropical plants like alocasia should be moved outside when night temperatures are consistently above 50-54°F. Plants like philodendron and peace lily can go outside when temperatures are above 55°F, while prayer plants and calathea need temperatures above 59°F.

Research your plant’s needs and monitor outdoor temperatures to ensure a smooth transition. Following these tips will help your houseplants enjoy the benefits of outdoor living during the warmer months.

Re-reported from the article originally published in Homes & gardens.