The Twelfth of 21 ways women have redefined the world: Human Rights

Rigoberta Menchú, Shirin Ebadi, and Nadia Murad are prominent figures in the fight for human rights, each contributing significantly to the global awareness of injustices and advocating for the oppressed.

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Rigoberta Menchú Tum, a K’iche’ Maya woman from Guatemala, is a prominent indigenous rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Born in 1959, early life was marked by the violence and oppression of Guatemala’s civil war. Her father, mother, and brother were killed by government forces, an experience that fueled her activism. I, Rigoberta Menchú, published in 1983, brought international attention to the plight of indigenous peoples in Latin America, detailing her life story and the broader struggles of her community against systemic racism, poverty, and violence.

Shirin Ebadi

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Shirin Ebadi, an Iranian lawyer, judge, and human rights activist, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003 for her significant efforts in promoting democracy and human rights, particularly for women and children in Iran. Born in 1947, She was the first female judge in Iran before being forced to resign after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Despite this setback, she continued her legal work, defending dissidents and advocating for reform. She founded the Defenders of Human Rights Center in Iran and has authored numerous books and articles highlighting legal injustices and calling for political change.

Nadia Murad

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Nadia Murad, a Yazidi woman from Iraq, is a human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, recognized for her efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict. Born in 1993, Murad’s life was tragically altered when ISIS militants attacked her village in 2014, killing many of her family members and subjecting her to enslavement and abuse. Murad’s advocacy includes raising awareness through her memoir, The Last Girl, and speaking at numerous international forums, including the United Nations. She co-founded Nadia’s Initiative, an organization aimed at helping survivors of sexual violence rebuild their lives and communities.

Inspired from the story by Sarah Griffin published in msn.com

The Twelfth of 21 ways women have redefined the world: Human Rights

Rigoberta Menchú, Shirin Ebadi, and Nadia Murad are prominent figures in the fight for human rights, each contributing significantly to the global awareness of injustices and advocating for the oppressed.

Image credit: Wikipedia

Rigoberta Menchú Tum, a K’iche’ Maya woman from Guatemala, is a prominent indigenous rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Born in 1959, early life was marked by the violence and oppression of Guatemala’s civil war. Her father, mother, and brother were killed by government forces, an experience that fueled her activism. I, Rigoberta Menchú, published in 1983, brought international attention to the plight of indigenous peoples in Latin America, detailing her life story and the broader struggles of her community against systemic racism, poverty, and violence.

Shirin Ebadi

Image credit: Wikipedia

Shirin Ebadi, an Iranian lawyer, judge, and human rights activist, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2003 for her significant efforts in promoting democracy and human rights, particularly for women and children in Iran. Born in 1947, She was the first female judge in Iran before being forced to resign after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Despite this setback, she continued her legal work, defending dissidents and advocating for reform. She founded the Defenders of Human Rights Center in Iran and has authored numerous books and articles highlighting legal injustices and calling for political change.

Nadia Murad

Image credit: Wikipedia

Nadia Murad, a Yazidi woman from Iraq, is a human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate, recognized for her efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict. Born in 1993, Murad’s life was tragically altered when ISIS militants attacked her village in 2014, killing many of her family members and subjecting her to enslavement and abuse. Murad’s advocacy includes raising awareness through her memoir, The Last Girl, and speaking at numerous international forums, including the United Nations. She co-founded Nadia’s Initiative, an organization aimed at helping survivors of sexual violence rebuild their lives and communities.

Inspired from the story by Sarah Griffin published in msn.com