Cholesterol
Image Credit: India Today

Cholesterol is a complex topic when it comes to health. This waxy substance, produced by the liver and present in all cells, is essential for maintaining cell membrane integrity, producing hormones, and supporting brain development.
To delve into cholesterol and its functions, Dr. LK Jha, a cardiologist at Asian Hospital, explains that there are two main types: triglycerides and LDL (low-density lipoprotein or bad cholesterol), as well as HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or good cholesterol. For a typical person, the total cholesterol range should be between 150 and 200. Triglycerides should be less than 150, LDL less than 160, and HDL should be above 35.
Processed foods are a common source of bad cholesterol, according to Dr. Jha. Foods kept in the frozen section for extended periods and junk food containing preservatives tend to have high cholesterol levels. Opting for fresh food, even when eating out, is recommended.
Dr. Gupta, a Consultant Physician & Diabetologist at Yashoda Hospitals, highlights that increased consumption of cholesterol-heavy, saturated fat, and trans fat-rich foods can raise bad cholesterol levels. Conditions such as diabetes, hypothyroidism, liver or kidney diseases, and polycystic ovarian disorder can also contribute to elevated bad cholesterol levels.
Exercising is an excellent way to increase good cholesterol in the body, in addition to avoiding animal-based foods to lower LDL levels. Factors like genetics and liver health also influence cholesterol. Roughly 15% of people have some form of cholesterol abnormalities.
To manage Cholesterol, it’s advised to limit foods high in cholesterol, saturated fat, and trans fats, while increasing intake of mono and polyunsaturated fats (e.g., safflower, sunflower, and fish oil). Including nuts in the diet can also help reduce blood cholesterol levels.
Re-reported from the article originally published in India Today.

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Understanding Good and Bad Cholesterol: Key Information

Cholesterol
Image Credit: India Today

Cholesterol is a complex topic when it comes to health. This waxy substance, produced by the liver and present in all cells, is essential for maintaining cell membrane integrity, producing hormones, and supporting brain development.
To delve into cholesterol and its functions, Dr. LK Jha, a cardiologist at Asian Hospital, explains that there are two main types: triglycerides and LDL (low-density lipoprotein or bad cholesterol), as well as HDL (high-density lipoprotein) or good cholesterol. For a typical person, the total cholesterol range should be between 150 and 200. Triglycerides should be less than 150, LDL less than 160, and HDL should be above 35.
Processed foods are a common source of bad cholesterol, according to Dr. Jha. Foods kept in the frozen section for extended periods and junk food containing preservatives tend to have high cholesterol levels. Opting for fresh food, even when eating out, is recommended.
Dr. Gupta, a Consultant Physician & Diabetologist at Yashoda Hospitals, highlights that increased consumption of cholesterol-heavy, saturated fat, and trans fat-rich foods can raise bad cholesterol levels. Conditions such as diabetes, hypothyroidism, liver or kidney diseases, and polycystic ovarian disorder can also contribute to elevated bad cholesterol levels.
Exercising is an excellent way to increase good cholesterol in the body, in addition to avoiding animal-based foods to lower LDL levels. Factors like genetics and liver health also influence cholesterol. Roughly 15% of people have some form of cholesterol abnormalities.
To manage Cholesterol, it’s advised to limit foods high in cholesterol, saturated fat, and trans fats, while increasing intake of mono and polyunsaturated fats (e.g., safflower, sunflower, and fish oil). Including nuts in the diet can also help reduce blood cholesterol levels.
Re-reported from the article originally published in India Today.