WHO: High Physical Inactivity Among Indians Reported

Image credit: Unsplash

A recent study published in The Lancet Global Health has unveiled alarming trends in physical inactivity among Indian adults, highlighting significant health risks associated with sedentary lifestyles. According to the findings spanning from 2000 to 2022 across 197 countries, nearly half of Indian adults fail to meet the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommended levels of physical activity. In 2022, the percentage of physically inactive adults in India rose to 45.4%, up from 22.4% in 2000. The study underscores a notable gender gap, with 52.6% of women and 38.4% of men reporting physical inactivity.

The health consequences of such inactivity are severe, increasing the susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and various cancers. WHO guidelines advocate for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week to maintain optimal health. However, the rise in sedentary lifestyles, exacerbated by modern office work and technological advances, has hindered many adults in India from meeting these benchmarks.

Dr. Hitesh Bhandari from the Indian Spinal Injuries Centre emphasizes the orthopaedic challenges posed by sedentary habits, noting a rise in patients suffering from osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and chronic lower back pain. These conditions are prevalent among adults aged 40-65, who typically have desk-bound jobs and insufficient physical activity.

Dr. Balbir Singh from Max Super Speciality Hospital highlights the heightened cardiovascular risks associated with inactivity, affecting both older adults and increasingly younger generations engaged in sedentary occupations. He observes that a significant proportion of his patients, across various age groups, lead sedentary lifestyles, indicative of a widespread issue.

Women, in particular, face a higher risk of physical inactivity, often misjudging household chores as adequate exercise. This misconception contributes to their higher levels of inactivity compared to men, as noted by Dr. Singh.

Furthermore, there has been a troubling rise in cancer cases among younger individuals linked to sedentary lifestyles and poor dietary habits. Dr. Anoop Saraya from ILBS and Dr. Pragya Shukla from Delhi State Cancer Institute emphasize the correlation between inactivity and increased risks of breast and colon cancers.

Dr. Praveen Gupta from Fortis Hospital underscores the mental health implications of insufficient physical activity, citing its contribution to anxiety and depression.

Addressing the escalating levels of physical inactivity necessitates urgent public health initiatives promoting regular physical activity and healthier lifestyle choices. Raising awareness about the benefits of staying active and reducing sedentary behaviors, especially among office workers and women, is crucial for mitigating the growing health risks associated with this issue in India.

Re-reported from the article originally published in MSN.

WHO: High Physical Inactivity Among Indians Reported

Image credit: Unsplash

A recent study published in The Lancet Global Health has unveiled alarming trends in physical inactivity among Indian adults, highlighting significant health risks associated with sedentary lifestyles. According to the findings spanning from 2000 to 2022 across 197 countries, nearly half of Indian adults fail to meet the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommended levels of physical activity. In 2022, the percentage of physically inactive adults in India rose to 45.4%, up from 22.4% in 2000. The study underscores a notable gender gap, with 52.6% of women and 38.4% of men reporting physical inactivity.

The health consequences of such inactivity are severe, increasing the susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, dementia, and various cancers. WHO guidelines advocate for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week to maintain optimal health. However, the rise in sedentary lifestyles, exacerbated by modern office work and technological advances, has hindered many adults in India from meeting these benchmarks.

Dr. Hitesh Bhandari from the Indian Spinal Injuries Centre emphasizes the orthopaedic challenges posed by sedentary habits, noting a rise in patients suffering from osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and chronic lower back pain. These conditions are prevalent among adults aged 40-65, who typically have desk-bound jobs and insufficient physical activity.

Dr. Balbir Singh from Max Super Speciality Hospital highlights the heightened cardiovascular risks associated with inactivity, affecting both older adults and increasingly younger generations engaged in sedentary occupations. He observes that a significant proportion of his patients, across various age groups, lead sedentary lifestyles, indicative of a widespread issue.

Women, in particular, face a higher risk of physical inactivity, often misjudging household chores as adequate exercise. This misconception contributes to their higher levels of inactivity compared to men, as noted by Dr. Singh.

Furthermore, there has been a troubling rise in cancer cases among younger individuals linked to sedentary lifestyles and poor dietary habits. Dr. Anoop Saraya from ILBS and Dr. Pragya Shukla from Delhi State Cancer Institute emphasize the correlation between inactivity and increased risks of breast and colon cancers.

Dr. Praveen Gupta from Fortis Hospital underscores the mental health implications of insufficient physical activity, citing its contribution to anxiety and depression.

Addressing the escalating levels of physical inactivity necessitates urgent public health initiatives promoting regular physical activity and healthier lifestyle choices. Raising awareness about the benefits of staying active and reducing sedentary behaviors, especially among office workers and women, is crucial for mitigating the growing health risks associated with this issue in India.

Re-reported from the article originally published in MSN.